Lorne Beug

About the Artist

Growing up on his parents farm northeast of Regina (Saskatchewan), Lorne Beug enjoyed many hours collecting rocks and digging in the soil to unearth secret compartments and artifacts hidden below. On one of Beug’s childhood archaeological digs, he encouraged a friend to continue digging more deeply by hiding a special object for him to unearth.  Beug continued to pursue his interest in what lay beneath the surface of things, graduating from the University of Regina with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Anthropology and Psychology in 1969.

Lorne Beug was always interested in art but was never serious about pursuing an artistic career until the early 1970s when he enrolled in  ceramicsPottery or hollow clay sculpture fired at high temperatures in a kiln or oven to make them harder and stronger. Types include earthenware, porcelain, stoneware, and terra cotta. (Artlex.com)  classes at the University of Regina. Artists like Joe Fafard, Vic Cicansky, Marilyn Levine and David Gilhooly David Gilhooly (Instructors in  clayMud; moist, sticky dirt. In ceramics, clay is the basic material, usually referring to any of a certain variety of mixtures of such ingredients — fine-grained, firm earthy material that is plastic when wet, brittle when dry, and very hard when heated. There is a temperature with ceramic clays at which their particles fuse (vitrification), and this is most commonly controlled by heating (firing) them in a kiln. The most common types of ceramic clays are earthenware (terra cotta when fired, terra cruda when not), stonewares, and porcelain. (Artlex.com)  and  sculptureA three-dimensional work of art, or the art of making it. Such works may be carved, modeled, constructed, or cast. Sculptures can also be described as assemblage, in the round, and relief, and made in a huge variety of media. A sculptor is one who creates sculptures. (artlex.com)  at the University of Regina) and Ron Nagal (Emma Lake workshop, 1976) were influential in his development at that time.

Beug explores a  varietyPrinciple of design concerned with difference or contrasts.  of ideas in his artwork. While he often uses  imageryAn image is a picture, idea, or impression of a person, thing, or idea; or a mental picture of a person, thing, or idea. The word imagery refers to a group or body of related images. (Artlex.com)  from the prairie landscape as a starting point, he also references his interests in  archaeology, anthropology, psychoanalysis, ecology, architecture and geology. In addition, Beug also combines ideas related to time in many of his works as he often suggests the past, the present and the future.

Anne Suche comments about one of Beug‘s constructed environments Hawk’s House, seen in the ARTSask theme Place, “the unglazed  clayMud; moist, sticky dirt. In ceramics, clay is the basic material, usually referring to any of a certain variety of mixtures of such ingredients — fine-grained, firm earthy material that is plastic when wet, brittle when dry, and very hard when heated. There is a temperature with ceramic clays at which their particles fuse (vitrification), and this is most commonly controlled by heating (firing) them in a kiln. The most common types of ceramic clays are earthenware (terra cotta when fired, terra cruda when not), stonewares, and porcelain. (Artlex.com)  forms at the bottom invariably represent the underground and the past; the  glazeA term used in ceramics to describe a thin coating of minerals which produces a glassy transparent or colored coating on bisque ware. Typically applied either by brushing, dipping, or spraying, it is fixed by firing the bisque ware in a kiln. This makes the surface smooth, shiny, and waterproof. Also, a glaze can be a thin, translucent or transparent coat over a painting, sometimes meant simply to protect the paint underneath, but more often to add a veil of colouration to an area of a picture. (artlex.com)  represents the surface and the present; and the glass and metal extensions - continuums of the ceramics, but on a higher technological note -- symbolize the future.” (Suche, 1987)

Over the years Beug has gradually shifted away from clay, and he currently incorporates a  varietyPrinciple of design concerned with difference or contrasts.  of  mediaAny material and technique used to produce a work of art (paint, glass, clay, fibre, video, sound, etc.). It may also refer to the liquid with which powdered pigments are mixed to make paint. Note that the plural form of “medium” is “media.”  in his work. Today he may use drawing, installation, photography, mixed media assemblage, computer technology,  collagePainting and/or gluing a variety of materials on a prepared surface to create a work of art.  or any combination of processes to communicate his message. To see an example of Beug’s collage work go to Monument to a Wonder City in the ARTSask theme Future Perfect

Beug is a highly respected Saskatchewan artist whose large public commissions can be seen at the Lawson Aquatic Centre and the Riddell Centre at the  University of Regina. He exhibits regularly and his works are included in many prominent collections.


Guide Book to a Ghost Town
Hawk's House Description
How He Got Started as an Artist
Interview with Timothy Long - Funk Art and the Regina Clay Movement
The Reason He Called it Hawk's House
Why the Table Shape
Canadian Heritage University of Regina Mackenzie Art Gallery Mendel Art Gallery Sask Learning